Sydney Conservatorium of Music http://music.sydney.edu.au Wed, 23 Jul 2014 01:37:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Sydney’s top music students on stage in Italy for first chamber music summer school http://music.sydney.edu.au/sydneys-top-music-students-stage-italy-first-chamber-music-summer-school/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=sydneys-top-music-students-stage-italy-first-chamber-music-summer-school http://music.sydney.edu.au/sydneys-top-music-students-stage-italy-first-chamber-music-summer-school/#comments Wed, 02 Jul 2014 00:32:38 +0000 superadmin http://music.sydney.edu.au/?p=3264 The finest musicians from the Sydney Conservatorium of Music are about to set off for the first European Chamber Music Summer School in Italy this week. The inaugural Estivo will see 47 tertiary music students from the University of Sydney’s … Continue reading

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Students preparing to attend the inaugural chamber music summer school in Italy.The finest musicians from the Sydney Conservatorium of Music are about to set off for the first European Chamber Music Summer School in Italy this week. The inaugural Estivo will see 47 tertiary music students from the University of Sydney’s music faculty perform in over 20 concerts in 12 historic venues across 3 major cities – Verona, Venice and Mantova – in northern Italy from 7-19 July.

Sydney Conservatorium of Music’s Dean Dr Karl Kramer said: “It is the first international music program of its kind made available to Australian tertiary music students. It’s going to be demanding, but an incredible experience for our students to take part in an intensive two week chamber music program, performing in some of Europe’s most magnificent venues and most popular tourist spots.”

The students will stage daily concerts in piazzas, churches, conservatories, palaces, concert venues and government offices.  Prestigious venues like the Bibiena Theatre, where Mozart gave his first performance, the Palazzo Te also in Mantova, and La Pieta in Venice, are just a few of the iconic places where the performances will be held.

Comprising eight chamber music ensembles – two wind quintets, brass quintet, saxophone quartet, three string quartets, and a piano trio – plus six pianists accompanying six opera singers, these talented young musicians will perform repertoire from the traditional chamber music canon. In between the rigorous concert schedule, they will work closely with some of the best teachers from all over Europe, as well as key mentors from the Sydney Con and Australia’s pre-imminent string quartet, the Goldner String Quartet.

Bridget O’Donnell from the Hillel String Quartet, one of the ensembles taking part, said: “The four of us have been together since the start of 2012, mainly playing in Sydney. This will be our first time together overseas, which will be an awesome experience.

“Italy is such a beautiful country, steeped in music history and culture. It will be the perfect place to improve our chamber music skills.  We hope that the experience will make us more resilient performers and we’re also quite excited about consuming large amounts of pasta!” she said.

Estivo has been set up in collaboration with the Conservatorio di Verona, where the students will be based, and the Conservatorio di Musica in Mantova. It coincides with Verona’s world-renowned summer festival of opera, the Arena di Verona Festival, which students will attend.

The Sydney Conservatorium of Music’s top students were selected through a competitive audition process earlier this year to join the inaugural European Chamber Music School in Italy.

An annual event, Estivo is a commitment by the University of Sydney to give Australia’s preeminent young classical musicians insight and exposure to studying and performing internationally.

Follow the students at Estivo in Italy at http://sydneycon-estivo.tumblr.com/

Media Enquiries: Mandy Campbell on 0481 012 742 or mandy.campbell@sydney.edu.au

The ensembles and musicians attending Estivo

Bennelong Brass – Jonathan Baker, Milo Dodd, Owen Morris, Tim Skelly, Benjamin Turner

Estivo Piano Trio – Jonathan Bekes, Fox Chan, Ying Ho

Fracture Saxophone Quartet – Peter Chao, Nathan Henshaw, Peter Leung, Simon Watts

Adelphi String Quartet – Yeonhee Kim, Josephine Lumanau, Bernadette Morrison, Klara Morrison

Hillel String Quartet – Benjamin Adler, Bethan Lillicrap, Bridget O’Donnell, Elizabeth Woolnough

4 String Quartet – Nathan Greentree, Vincent Lo, Kay-Yin Teoh, Benjamin Tjoa

Festivo Wind Quintet – Cameron Burgess, Chloe Chung, Joshua Davies, Toshiyuki Hosogaya, Justin Sun

The Sydney Zephyr Wind Quintet – James Fisher, Osvaldo Junior, Katrina Todd, Gillian Williams, Sarah Young

Vocalists - Damian Arnold, Zoe Drummond, Sarah Kemeny, Imogen Malfitano, Daniel Nicholson and Joshua Oxley

Pianists - Pavle Cajic, Sherilyn Chen, Su Choung, Patrick Keith, Rachael Lin and Alex Waite

Estivo: European Chamber Music Summer School will be staged thanks to the generous support of Il Conservatorio Statale di Musica ‘Evaristo Felice Dall’ Abaco’ di Verona and Conservatorio di Musica ‘Lucio Campiani’ Mantova.

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A master in the language of music to join the Con http://music.sydney.edu.au/master-language-music-join-con/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=master-language-music-join-con http://music.sydney.edu.au/master-language-music-join-con/#comments Wed, 11 Jun 2014 05:11:37 +0000 superadmin http://music.sydney.edu.au/?p=3193 The Sydney Conservatorium of Music announces the appointment of the esteemed music theorist, Richard Cohn, to the role of Professor of Music from January 2015.  American-born Cohn is currently at Yale University, one of the oldest tertiary institutions in the … Continue reading

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Richard Cohn

Richard Cohn will join the Sydney Conservatorium of Music as a Professor of Music in 2015.

The Sydney Conservatorium of Music announces the appointment of the esteemed music theorist, Richard Cohn, to the role of Professor of Music from January 2015.  American-born Cohn is currently at Yale University, one of the oldest tertiary institutions in the US, where he has been the Battell Professor of the Theory of Music since 2005.

Richard Cohn’s face will be familiar to many staff and students following his six month stint at the Con during the first half of last year as an Honorary Professor, when he spoke at several seminars at the University of Sydney’s music faculty.

Cohn brings great expertise in music theory to the Con. He is noted for his particular interest in chromatic harmony, metric dissonance, Schenkerian theory, atonal pitch-class theory and Lewinian transformational theory, among other topics.

A prolific writer, Cohn founded the Oxford Studies in Music Theory in 2004, which he edited for Oxford University Press for ten years. Currently, he is editor of the Journal of Music Theory, the US’ oldest music journal in its field.

Cohn is known for publishing widely on the music of Beethoven, Schubert, Brahms, Wagner, Bartok and Reich, and has written extensively for many professional publications, including the Journal of Music Theory, Music Theory Spectrum, Nineteenth-Century Music and Music Theory Online.

While a regular speaker at academic conferences and other meetings of music specialists, he has also presented non-academic lectures that have covered topics from an exploration of Haydn’s The Seasons to a musical analysis of Martin Luther King’s I Have a Dream speech.

Prior to Yale University, Cohn taught in the music department at the University of Chicago from 1985, where he served as its Chair from 1998 to 2001. He also held several directorships of undergraduate and graduate studies, and of a music theory mentoring partnership.

A graduate of Brown University, Rhode Island, in 1977, Cohn earned his doctorate from the Eastman School of Music at the University of Rochester, New York, in 1987.

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New conductor brings change of wind to the Con http://music.sydney.edu.au/new-conductor-brings-change-wind-con/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=new-conductor-brings-change-wind-con http://music.sydney.edu.au/new-conductor-brings-change-wind-con/#comments Mon, 26 May 2014 02:15:11 +0000 superadmin http://music.sydney.edu.au/?p=3167 Dr John Lynch, the phenomenal American wind conductor of international repute, has arrived in Australia to take up his new teaching role at the University of Sydney’s Conservatorium of Music and lead the Con’s Wind Symphony in their first concert … Continue reading

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Dr John Lynch, the phenomenal American wind conductor of international repute, has arrived in Australia to take up his new teaching role at the University of Sydney’s Conservatorium of Music and lead the Con’s Wind Symphony in their first concert together on Thursday, 29 May.

Dr John Lynch

Dr John Lynch

John Lynch hails from New York State and has led some of the finest university band programs in the United States before coming to Sydney.

“I’m very excited to be joining the music faculty of the University of Sydney and building a world-class wind symphony program with the very talented Australian students here.  My role in Sydney should prove to be remarkable, if not life changing!” said Dr John Lynch.

With more than 25 years teaching and conducting experience, Dr Lynch is the first wind conductor to assume a full-time position in a tertiary music school in Australia, signaling a new dawn in the wind band movement in this country.

“Dr Lynch is an exceptional musician with a deep knowledge of wind repertoire and vast international experience in teaching music and performing.  He will play a key role in shaping Australia’s next conductors and growing our post-graduate wind band programs at the Con. I could not think of a better mentor for our conducting and wind musicians in this country,” said Dr Karl Kramer, Dean of the Sydney Conservatorium of Music.

The much-anticipated concert this Thursday will see John Lynch and the Conservatorium Wind Symphony stage an intriguing program, which presents historically-significant composers through the lens of contemporary composition.  Highlights include award-winning masterworks by Dana Wilson, Ron Nelson, and Pulitzer Prize winner Steven Stucky, alongside Purcell, Bach and Strauss.

Following an Australian and international search last year, Dr Lynch was appointed Associate Professor of Music and Artistic Director and Conductor of the Conservatorium’s Wind Symphony in November 2013. He comes from the University of Georgia where he was Director of Bands and Professor of Music at the Hodgson School of Music, overseeing an extensive band and graduate wind conducting programs for the last seven years.

During his international career, Dr Lynch has toured and performed extensively throughout the United States, Canada, Europe, South America and Asia, including invited tours of China and Argentina.  He has held prestigious residencies at the Vivaldi Conservatory in Alessandria, Italy, the Conservatory in Vilnius, Lithuania, and the University of Costa Rica.

With several recordings to his name, including the Naxos label’s Wind Band Classics Series, his music has been widely broadcasted across the United States, Europe and Japan. He is also an advocate of new music, which has seen him obtain grants to research contemporary compositions in Scandinavia, Spain and Portugal.

Dr Lynch’s love of wind music can be traced back to his childhood when he took up his first instruments, the clarinet and the piano, which he played throughout his school years.

“I’m very fortunate to have had inspiring role models throughout my life and career, and I look forward to giving that back to the future generations of Australian musicians,” he said.

Event details:
What: Greenway Series: Conservatorium Wind Symphony conducted by Dr John Lynch
Where: Sydney Conservatorium of Music, Verbrugghen Hall
When: Thursday, 29 May, 6.30pm
Cost: $20 adult, $10 concession/student
Tickets: Online at Sydney Conservatorium of Music or City Recital Hall, Angel Place on (02) 8256 2222

Media Enquiries: Mandy Campbell, 0481 012 742 or mandy.campbell@sydney.edu.au

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Mozart meets Menotti in a 1930s radio opera http://music.sydney.edu.au/mozart-meets-menotti/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=mozart-meets-menotti http://music.sydney.edu.au/mozart-meets-menotti/#comments Fri, 02 May 2014 05:08:46 +0000 superadmin http://music.sydney.edu.au/?p=3116 In its first big opera production of the year, the Sydney Conservatorium of Music will take audiences back in time to the 1930s and the golden age of live radio plays. But there is a production twist, when two comical … Continue reading

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Cast members experiment with sound at the Foley desk during rehearsals for the upcoming 1930s radio opera at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music. Photo: Louis Dillon Savage.

Cast members experiment with sound at the Foley desk during rehearsals for the upcoming 1930s radio opera at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music. Photo: Louis Dillon Savage.

In its first big opera production of the year, the Sydney Conservatorium of Music will take audiences back in time to the 1930s and the golden age of live radio plays. But there is a production twist, when two comical works, Menotti’s The Old Maid and the Thief and Mozart’s The Impresario, meet on the same stage in an opera double bill over four performances in May.

One of the first operas written for radio, The Old Maid and the Thief premiered in the United States in 1939. It sets the scene for the Sydney Conservatorium of Music’s first double bill, which will see Menotti’s wickedly-funny production staged alongside Mozart’s humorous 1786, one-act German opera.

Stephen Mould, musical director and Chair of Opera Productions at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, said: “While the two works are centuries apart, they both share a similar, mischievous thread that work beautifully together in a live radio opera.

“We have all the elements and talent for staging an exciting radio drama that were so popular during the 30s and 40s. The big brassy band, the powerful singers and the lively theatrics typical of radio plays, will be revived by our orchestral musicians and opera singers,” said Stephen Mould.

Set and lighting designers Elizabeth Gadsby and Alexander Berlage will recreate the world inside a 1930s radio studio, where the audience becomes part of the set as they play the part of a live studio audience. The Foley desk, where the everyday sound effects of clinking tea cups, creaky doors and running footsteps were made by Foley artists, also promises to be a special set feature.

“With no visual component, radio drama depends on great dialogue, music and sound effects to enable the listener to imagine the characters and scenes. Seeing these elements brought together in a live radio production where every second counts, is an exciting spectacle to watch,” said Stephen Mould.

Renowned Sydney director Sally Blackwood will direct the 17-strong cast, accompanied by the Sydney Con orchestra conducted Stephen Mould. The principal roles will be played by the Con’s rising opera stars Alexander Knight and Andrew Williams, who share the role of Bob, while Corinne Parker and Audrey Gabor will share the role of Laetitia in The Old Maid and the Thief. Joel Scott and Daniel Tambasco will play the role of The Impresario, alongside Kathryn Williams as Madame Heartmelt.

The Sydney Conservatorium of Music’s bi-annual opera productions have been a launching pad for the next generation of top Australian opera stars. Young soprano student Jenny Liu, who starred in the Con’s last opera in November 2013, is currently making her professional debut in the Australian musical production of The King and I.

The Sydney Conservatorium of Music’s first 2014 opera will be presented over four afternoon and evening performances in May, kicking off on Saturday 17 May.

Event details:

What: Opera double bill: Menotti’s The Old Maid and the Thief and Mozart’s The Impresario
Where: Sydney Conservatorium of Music
When: Saturday 17 May (6.30pm), Tuesday 20 May (6.30pm), Thursday 22 May (6.30pm), Saturday 24 May (2.00pm)
Cost: $50 adult, $25 concession
Bookings: City Recital Hall: www.cityrecitalhall.com or phone 1300 797 118

About the Opera double bill
Menotti’s The Old Maid and the Thief is best described as an American farce, dubbed by the composer as a ‘Grotesque Opera’. It tells the story of a ‘busybody’, Miss Todd, and her maid, Laetitia, whose hermetic small town world is turned upside down by the arrival of Bob, a handsome wanderer. Thrilled by his arrival into their lives, the ladies lavishly host and entertain him. However, it soon becomes apparent that Bob may not be who he appears to be, drawing all three into a web of lies and confusion.

Mozart’s The Impresario (Der Schauspieldirektor) takes an insider’s, sideways look at the world and tribulations of an opera impresario, as he attempts to establish a performing troupe. Hamstrung by competing prima donnas vying for his attention, and hoodwinked by the mercenary Mr Bluff, the Impresario must navigate his way through temperamental behaviour, bribery, mercenary misdemeanors – all in all, just an average day in the opera trade.

Media Enquiries:
Mandy Campbell, 0481 012 742 or mandy.campbell@sydney.edu.au

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The Con’s trifecta for Australia’s richest violin prize http://music.sydney.edu.au/cons-trifecta-australias-richest-violin-prize/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=cons-trifecta-australias-richest-violin-prize http://music.sydney.edu.au/cons-trifecta-australias-richest-violin-prize/#comments Mon, 14 Apr 2014 03:19:54 +0000 superadmin http://music.sydney.edu.au/?p=3065   Three finalists competing in the final round of Australia’s richest violin competition this week in Melbourne, staged by the Melbourne Conservatorium of Music at The University Of Melbourne, are all former students of the Sydney Conservatorium of Music. Doretta … Continue reading

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Former Sydney Conservatorium of Music students Anne-Marie Johnson, Doretta Balkizas and Emily Sun compete for Australia’s richest violin prize this week. Photo: Melbourne Conservatorium of Music.

Former Sydney Conservatorium of Music students (L-R) Anne-Marie Johnson, Doretta Balkizas and Emily Sun compete for Australia’s richest violin prize this week. Photo: Melbourne Conservatorium of Music.

Three finalists competing in the final round of Australia’s richest violin competition this week in Melbourne, staged by the Melbourne Conservatorium of Music at The University Of Melbourne, are all former students of the Sydney Conservatorium of Music.

Doretta Balkizas, Anne-Marie Johnson and Emily Sun will appear at the Melbourne Recital Centre in a gala concert as they perform their chosen concertos with the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra on Thursday 17 April at 7pm.

Goetz Richter, Associate Professor of Violin and Chair of Strings at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, University of Sydney, said:  “We are thrilled about the success of our students in this competition.

“Over the past years we have worked very hard to build a comprehensive program of performance development to give our exceptional teachers the support they need in their work with these talented students.

“It is a combination of both teacher and student individual brilliance and the way we work together that makes the Sydney Conservatorium such an exceptional place for learning,” he said.

Established in 1981, the 2014 Dorcas McCLean Travelling Scholarship is open to violinists across the country aged 25 years and under, who are competing for the top $40,000 prize.  The prize enables the winner to undertake further study overseas, and the opportunity to record and perform with the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra during the tenure of their scholarship.

Doretta Balkizas, who graduated from the Sydney Conservatorium of Music last year, said: “Performing with the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra is such a great opportunity, and was the reason I was drawn to enter the competition. The fact that it also has a significant travel scholarship is an added bonus, but one doesn’t think too much about that!”

Melbourne Conservatorium’s Head of Strings, and Head Adjudicator of the competition, violinist Curt Thompson said, “I’m extremely excited to be a part of this year’s Dorcas McClean Travelling Scholarship. While I’m still new to Australia, in my career overseas I have performed and competed with past winners of this significant national competition.”

“The importance of the Dorcas McClean to young Australian violinists is profound, particularly this year as the winner will have the unique opportunity to perform and record with the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra,” he said.

A shortlist of six violinists competed in an all-day recital yesterday at the University of Melbourne’s Melba Hall for the chance to progress through to the final round this Thursday. Current Sydney Conservatorium of Music students James Dong and Wendy Kong, and former student Xenia Deviatkina-Loh were also in the running.

“It was a nice surprise that all the contestants were from the Sydney Con.  Xenia, Emily, Anne-Marie, James and I had studied together there, so it was a lovely opportunity to catch up,” said Doretta.

A panel of three prominent Australian violinists including the Concertmaster of the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra Wilma Smith, former First Violin of the Australian String Quartet Sophie Rowell and Melbourne Conservatorium’s Head of Strings Curt Thompson will judge the final round at the gala performance on Thursday.  The overall winner will be announced at the end of the concert.

Tickets to the gala concert can be purchased online from the Melbourne Recital Centre  Ticket prices are $35 adult and $25 concession.

Media Enquiries: Mandy Campbell, 0481 012 742 or mandy.campbell@sydney.edu.au

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Students make new music connections for summit finale http://music.sydney.edu.au/students-make-new-music-connections-summit-finale/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=students-make-new-music-connections-summit-finale http://music.sydney.edu.au/students-make-new-music-connections-summit-finale/#comments Fri, 04 Apr 2014 00:28:44 +0000 Grace Hall http://music.sydney.edu.au/?p=3030 Whilst the heads of eleven elite tertiary music schools from the Asia Pacific region have been meeting in Sydney this week for an inaugural music summit, Australian and Chinese students have been preparing for their first concert for the summit … Continue reading

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Whilst the heads of eleven elite tertiary music schools from the Asia Pacific region have been meeting in Sydney this week for an inaugural music summit, Australian and Chinese students have been preparing for their first concert for the summit finale at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music on 5 April.

A student cohort of 35 musicians from Beijing, Shanghai, Melbourne and Sydney conservatories have attended workshops, exchanged music notes and taken part in intensive rehearsals to stage a free orchestral concert for the music leaders and general public this Saturday night.

Eduardo Diazmuñoz, Sydney Conservatorium of Music’s Chair of Conducting and conductor of the finale concert said: “It has been a delight to rehearse and watch students from two countries with very different cultural backgrounds and spoken languages make new connections through the love, passion and language of music.”

“The Chinese students’ approach to learning and playing music has provided a new dimension to the music we have been re-creating. The concert promises to be a wonderful finale to this student collaboration over the last few days,” he said.

A highlight of the concert is the premiere performances of two works composed by summit participants Professor Barry Conyngham AM from the Melbourne Conservatorium and Professor Xu Shuya from the Shanghai Conservatory.

“It is the first Sydney recital of Professor Conyhgham’s piece To the edge and the world-premiere of Professor Xu’s work In Nomine. It is an absolute honour to be conducting these premiere performances and very fitting that we have musicians from the home country of each composer delivering their pieces,” said Eduardo Diazmuñoz.

“Other classical pieces that will be performed during the concert are the powerful and moving compositions by Mexican composer Silvestre Revueltas (1899-1940), Spanish-Mexican composer Antonio Sarrier (1725-ca1762), which I believe are local premieres, and the world well-known Valse Triste by the celebrated Finish composer Jan Sibelius (1865-1957).”

The inaugural Asia Pacific Music Summit, which kicked off on 2nd April at the Sydney Opera House, aims to create closer ties between the music conservatories across the region, so more student collaborations of the performance kind can take place. The initiative is the brainchild of the Sydney Conservatorium of Music at the University of Sydney and Beijing Central Conservatory of Music, which are the joint hosts of the first summit in Sydney.

Event details:
What: Association of Asia-Pacific Music Institutions Sydney 2014 Finale
Where: Sydney Conservatorium of Music, Verbrugghen Hall
When: Saturday 5 April at 6.30pm
Cost/bookings: Free

Media Enquiries: Mandy Campbell, 0481 012 742 or mandy.campbell@sydney.edu.au

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Inaugural Asia Pacific Music Summit to build regional ties http://music.sydney.edu.au/inaugural-asia-pacific-music-summit-build-regional-ties/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=inaugural-asia-pacific-music-summit-build-regional-ties http://music.sydney.edu.au/inaugural-asia-pacific-music-summit-build-regional-ties/#comments Tue, 01 Apr 2014 00:11:04 +0000 superadmin http://music.sydney.edu.au/?p=3006 Eleven heads of the leading tertiary music schools from the Asia Pacific region will meet in Sydney this week for an augural music summit. The 2014 Asia Pacific Music Summit, which runs from 2-5 April, will create closer ties between … Continue reading

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Eleven heads of the leading tertiary music schools from the Asia Pacific region will meet in Sydney this week for an augural music summit. The 2014 Asia Pacific Music Summit, which runs from 2-5 April, will create closer ties between the music conservatories and build the region as a driving force behind music education and culture globally.

The initiative is the brainchild of the Sydney Conservatorium of Music at the University of Sydney and Beijing Central Conservatory of Music, which are the joint hosts of the summit that will take place at the Sydney Opera House.

The leaders of 11 pre-eminent music institutions will represent the tertiary education interests of China, Singapore, Japan, Hong Kong, Taiwan, the United States, New Zealand and Australia.  A group of 35 students from the Beijing, Shanghai, Melbourne and Sydney conservatories will also take part and prepare for an orchestral recital for the summit finale at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music on Saturday 5 April.

Sydney Conservatorium of Music’s Dean Dr Karl Kramer said: “This is a unique opportunity to meet face to face with our peers from the region’s top conservatoriums and discuss best practices in music education and performance.

“Whilst we all assume the western music tradition of teaching, each institution is mutually exclusively in terms of how it operates.  We are eleven unique case studies, each with different expertise to share.

“The summit is a starting point to forming stronger human connections between the institutions to encourage greater and more regular dialogue across the region,” said Dr Kramer.

The summit comes at a time when countries such as China are experiencing a major boom in classical music, and where the audiences are generally much younger than those markets in America and Europe.

Beijing Central Conservatory of Music’s President, Professor Wang Cizhao said: “The purpose of holding this summit is to strengthen the inter-conservatory exchange and collaboration more widely, so that the resources in the Asia Pacific region can be integrated and we can work together on promoting international music education.

“The inter-conservatory exchange will become a vital part of running a conservatory with the international development of music education across all countries. Through this summit, delegates can air their views on shared problems. Though each conservatory has its own cultural background and historical traditions, they will surely complement one another when facing a shared teaching problem,” said Professor Wang Cizhao.

During the four-day summit, the leaders will discuss course programs, student exchanges, industry collaborations, funding models and performance platforms.  Australian industry figures including Australia Council for the Arts’ Tony Grybowski, Sydney Symphony Orchestra’s Rory Jeffes, Sydney Opera House’s Louise Herron, University of Sydney’s Dr Michael Spence and media executive and composer Kim Williams AM, will share their vision for the performing arts sector in the region.

At the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, the student cohort from Australia and China will workshop and rehearse a program of classical orchestral pieces for the finale event.  The recital will include premiere performances of two works composed by two summit delegates, Professor Barry Conyngham AM from Melbourne and Professor Xu Shuya from Shanghai.

Whilst bi-lateral relations have existed for some time between many of the institutions across the region, the Sydney summit will be the first gathering of the Deans and Presidents who have officially formed the Association of Asia-Pacific Music Institutions (AAMI) this year.  The summit is expected to be held annually, hosted by a member of AAMI.

Media Enquiries: Mandy Campbell, 0481 012 742 or mandy.campbell@sydney.edu.au

The Association of Asia-Pacific Music Institutions (AAMI)

The members of the AAMI and delegates of the Asia-Pacific Music Summit (2-5 April 2014) are:

  • Dr Karl Kramer, Dean, Sydney Conservatorium of Music
  • Professor Wang Cizhao, President, Beijing Central Conservatory of Music
  • Professor Xu Shuya, President, Shanghai Conservatory of Music
  • Professor Bernard Lanskey, Director, Yong Siew Toh Conservatory of Music, National University of Singapore
  • Professor Barry Conyngham AM, Dean, Faculty of Victorian College of Arts and Melbourne Conservatorium of Music
  • Associate Professor Allan Badley, School Of Music, University of Auckland
  • President David H. Stull, President, San Francisco Conservatory of Music
  • Professor Robert Cutietta, Dean, Thornton School of Music, University of Southern California
  • Professor Adrian Walter, Director, Hong Kong Academy for Performing Arts
  • Dr Jinny Liu, School of Music, Taipei National University of the Arts
  • Professor Ueda Katsumi, Dean, School of Music, Tokyo University of the Arts
  • Professor Young-Yul Kim, Dean, The College of Music, Seoul National University (absent from Sydney summit)

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Investing in the jazz musicians of tomorrow http://music.sydney.edu.au/investing-jazz-musicians-tomorrow/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=investing-jazz-musicians-tomorrow http://music.sydney.edu.au/investing-jazz-musicians-tomorrow/#comments Tue, 25 Mar 2014 02:39:05 +0000 superadmin http://music.sydney.edu.au/?p=2979 Young, talented jazz musicians can now apply for the Sydney Conservatorium of Music’s first jazz scholarship, thanks to the generosity of jazz lovers, Anthony and Sharon Lee. The Anthony and Sharon Lee Foundation Jazz Scholarships will support two postgraduate and … Continue reading

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Young, talented jazz musicians can now apply for the Sydney Conservatorium of Music’s first jazz scholarship, thanks to the generosity of jazz lovers, Anthony and Sharon Lee.

The Anthony and Sharon Lee Foundation Jazz Scholarships will support two postgraduate and five undergraduate students for the duration of their degrees. The scholarships are designed to enable promising students who have genuine financial needs to reduce the number of hours they need to do paid work, so they can focus on their studies.

The Sydney Conservatorium (the Con) has produced some of the most outstanding, versatile and creative musicians on the jazz scene, many of whom are the inspiration and motivation behind the Lee’s decision to endow the scholarships.

“I have a lot of friends in the jazz world and most of them went to the Con,” says Anthony. “Some of them are now world-class musicians doing very well not just in Australia but also in places like New York City. I’m very impressed by the work of the Con, so making the decision to fund these scholarships wasn’t difficult at all.”

While the foundation is relatively new, Anthony and Sharon have been ardent supporters of a wide range of music-based organisations and activities, including the National Jazz Awards, Opera Australia and the Australian Chamber Orchestra. Anthony is also a dedicated volunteer serving his alma mater in the US, Princeton, where his passion for jazz led him to endow its jazz program, and fund a scholarship for international students. More recently, Anthony has been appointed as a Campaign board member for INSPIRED – the Campaign to support the University of Sydney.

Anthony’s love of jazz began at an early age, “My father used to have a whole collection of jazz vinyl. Even as a kid, when all my friends were listening to The Beatles, I’d be listening to Duke Ellington or Louis Armstrong.”

“I play the piano and guitar, and I used to play in bands at high school in Hong Kong before going to Princeton as an undergraduate to study mathematics in the 70s that’s where I took a jazz course which really cemented my love for music.”

A passion for music is something that runs through the whole family. Anthony, his wife Sharon and their son, a third-year Juris Doctor student at the University of Sydney, all play the guitar or piano, and their daughter is planning to pursue a postgraduate degree in jazz vocal in the United States.

Anthony and Sharon’s love of jazz has certainly been the catalyst for their philanthropic efforts. “Talent development is a major passion of ours,” says Anthony. “That’s why I don’t really see this funding as a gift; it’s an investment in talent.”

“In a field like jazz, it’s often quite difficult to make ends meet and that discourages a lot of young talent to pursue it. With this scholarship, hopefully we will help to lighten the financial burden of study.”

Anthony, whose current inspirations include John Coltrane, Keith Jarrett, Pat Metheny and Australian jazz legend, Mike Nock, hopes the scholarships and the impact of his investment will inspire others to support the genre, “It’s not easy to generate funding for jazz; it’s quite a niche area and that’s why I’m happy to have this opportunity to support the Con.”

Anthony moved to Australia in 1987, and currently works as a private investor and director of a number of publicly listed companies. He has experience in multiple fundraising campaigns. Most recently, he was an Executive Committee Member for Princeton’s Aspire Campaign which concluded in 2012, having raised a total of US$1.88 billion.

Chancellor Belinda Hutchinson AM says, “We are delighted to welcome Anthony as a new INSPIRED Campaign board member. His international fund-raising expertise and acumen will be of immense benefit to the University.”

“We are also extremely honored that the Anthony and Sharon Lee Foundation has selected the Sydney Conservatorium for its investment in the future of jazz. This is the first time we have been able to offer jazz-specific scholarships. It’s exciting to know that this financial assistance will not only have an enormous impact on seven of our students, as they work with leading jazz figures, but also on the nation’s music scene, and no doubt beyond.”

In his role of Campaign board member, Anthony plans to share his ideas and best practice in fundraising from the US. “Volunteerism is the key to success in the US – identifying the right people and making sure they’re passionate about the University and are well equipped to make the approach. We go through a lot of training in the US and I hope to share that in Australia.”

For more information on the Anthony and Sharon Lee Foundation Jazz Scholarships, including the application process, please email con.development@sydney.edu.au or call Lindsay on 02 9351 1385.

To read more about INSPIRED – the Campaign to support the University of Sydney, and to find out how you can help fund the pursuit of ideas that will shape the world in which we live, visit the INSPIRED website.

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World famous fortepianist stars in inaugural Chancellor’s Concert http://music.sydney.edu.au/world-famous-fortepianist-stars-inaugural-chancellors-concert/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=world-famous-fortepianist-stars-inaugural-chancellors-concert http://music.sydney.edu.au/world-famous-fortepianist-stars-inaugural-chancellors-concert/#comments Thu, 20 Mar 2014 04:55:22 +0000 superadmin http://music.sydney.edu.au/?p=2967 Renowned American pianist Steven Lubin, best known for his path-breaking performances of Mozart and Beethoven concertos on the fortepiano, is the international guest performer at the University of Sydney’s inaugural Chancellor’s Concert on Friday 28 March at the Sydney Conservatorium … Continue reading

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Mr.Lubin performing at the Musashino Cultural Center in Tokyo, Japan, October 2012.

Mr.Lubin performing at the Musashino Cultural Center in Tokyo, Japan, October 2012.

Renowned American pianist Steven Lubin, best known for his path-breaking performances of Mozart and Beethoven concertos on the fortepiano, is the international guest performer at the University of Sydney’s inaugural Chancellor’s Concert on Friday 28 March at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music.

Over his momentous 35 year career, Lubin has appeared as a concerto soloist and recitalist in many of the great concert halls all over the world.  His work has been described by some as “perhaps closer to what Beethoven heard in his imagination than anything recorded before.”

Sydney Conservatorium of Music Dean, Dr Karl Kramer said: “It is fitting to have such a pioneering musician as Steven Lubin appear as the first international guest musician at our inaugural Chancellor’s Concert.

“He is highly admired the world over for his artistry and technical brilliance in the delivery of the great classical compositions.

“This will be a stellar performance for our first symphony orchestral concert of the year.  It will be a great showcase of the international standard at which our students are performing and delivering their music.”

Steven Lubin’s first interest in historical performance led him to become internationally recognised for performing the great works of Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven and Schubert.  In a desire to be true to the sound of the classical masterpieces, Lubin regularly performed them on replica Viennese-action fortepianos – one of the highly-revered styles of piano manufacturing popular from the 1770s until the end of the 19th century.

Lubin’s pioneering work included a series of solo recitals including his 1977 debut in Carnegie Recital Hall in New York, when he performed Mozart works on his fortepiano and a large-scale Chopin work on a modern grand piano.

For the Inaugural Chancellor’s Concert, he will perform on a modern grand piano accompanied by the Sydney Conservatorium of Music’s Symphony Orchestra.  Together they will perform Mozart’s arousing Concerto No. 20 in D minor K466.  It was the first performance of the Piano Concerto No. 20 in Vienna in 1785 that saw Mozart as the soloist, the role which Lubin will play at the Chancellor’s Concert.

Lubin and the orchestra will be guided under the batton of Eduardo Diazmuñoz, who joined the Sydney Conservatorium of Music as its Chair of Conducting in late 2013.  A Mexican-Spaniard conductor with a career that spans 37 years and 15 countries, Diazmuñoz is described as one of the most versatile musicians of his generation.  Under Diazmuñoz’s skillful command, the Sydney Conservatorium Symphony Orchestra will also perform works by Sibelius and Brahms.

The Chancellor’s Concert, hosted for the first time by the University of Sydney’s Chancellor Belinda Hutchinson AM, marks the beginning of what will be an annual event at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music.  It will set the scene each year for the series of orchestral music concerts that will be staged by Australia’s premier tertiary music institution.

Event details:
What: Inaugural University of Sydney Chancellor’s Concert
Where: Sydney Conservatorium of Music
When: Friday 28 March, 6.30pm and Saturday, 29 March, 2pm
Cost: $20 adult and $10 concession/student/child
Bookings: www.cityrecitalhall.com or the Box Office at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music (from 1 hour prior to the concert)

Media Enquiries: Mandy Campbell, 0481 012 742 or mandy.campbell@sydney.edu.au

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The Con stages its first international music school in Europe http://music.sydney.edu.au/con-stages-first-international-music-school-europe/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=con-stages-first-international-music-school-europe http://music.sydney.edu.au/con-stages-first-international-music-school-europe/#comments Tue, 18 Mar 2014 02:46:17 +0000 superadmin http://music.sydney.edu.au/?p=2947 The Sydney Conservatorium of Music, the Music Faculty of the University of Sydney, will stage its first international music school and festival in Italy this July. A cohort of 46 tertiary students will participate in an intensive, two-week program of … Continue reading

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Con students audition yesterday for a position in the string quartets at Estivo in July. Photo Martin Carroll.

Con students audition yesterday for a position in the string quartets at Estivo in July.

The Sydney Conservatorium of Music, the Music Faculty of the University of Sydney, will stage its first international music school and festival in Italy this July. A cohort of 46 tertiary students will participate in an intensive, two-week program of chamber music concerts across Verona, Mantova and Venice, whilst they are taught by some of Europe’s finest music teachers.

The inaugural Estivo: European Chamber Music Summer School from 7-19 July is the first music program of its kind offered by a tertiary institution in Australia.

The initiative is in collaboration with the Conservatorio di Verona, where the students will be based, and the Conservatorio di Musica in Mantova. It will coincide with Verona’s world-renowned summer festival of opera, the Arena di Verona Festival, where students will attend rehearsals and performances.

Sydney Conservatorium of Music Dean, Dr Karl Kramer, said: “Estivo will give our students an intensive two-week forum in the heart of Western Europe, where they will study and perform with colleagues and mentors.

“At the Sydney Conservatorium, we are fortunate to have many international musicians and teachers both in residence and visiting us.  But by taking our students to Italy, we open numerous new opportunities with artists based in Europe.

“We have collaborations with leading music conservatories and universities overseas. This puts us in a great position to give our students the opportunity to perform in major cities and music hubs around the world,” he said.

During the two-week program, the Sydney Conservatorium of Music will present daily concerts in piazzas, churches, conservatories, palaces and official government offices across Northern Italy.  From prestigious venues such as the iconic Bibiena Theatre where Mozart gave his first performance, the Palazzo Te also in Mantova and La Pieta in Venice, it will be a unique and highly memorable event for the students.

In the European tradition, the students will perform chamber music in both orchestral and small ensembles.  A form of classical music, chamber music was originally composed for instrumental groups that could fit into a palace chamber.

“Chamber music requires a different set of skills to performing solo or symphony works. The smaller ensemble of musicians must work closely together to deliver a unified performance.

“We want our students to learn to work and perform with other musicians, as this is a crucial part of our teaching and the music experience at the Con,” said Dr Kramer.

Some of Europe’s finest musicians including Klaus Marx and Lella Cuberli will run a rigorous program of tutorials with students.  Klaus Marx is a cellist who specialised in chamber music throughout his career. He was a founding member of the Kolisch Piano Trio and the Leonardo Quartet Cologne.  While Lella Cuberli, an American soprano, made her professional debut in Siena in 1973 and for some years pursued a career in Italy, making her mark in Rossini, Donizetti and Bellini operas. Klaus and Lella will be joined by more than a dozen tutors from Italy and other parts of Europe.

Estivo is open to undergraduate and postgraduate Con students who are part of an ensemble. A range of ensembles including a piano trio, wind quintet, brass quintet, saxophone quartet, six vocalists and six pianists, and three string quartets will be chosen.

Students will take part in Estivo auditions at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music during March. The successful students will be announced at the end of the month. Travel, accommodation and all tuition will be provided by the Sydney Conservatorium of Music to the students.

To find out more about the Estivo: European Chamber Music Summer School visit the Estivo webpage on Con’s website.

Media Enquiries: Mandy Campbell, 0481 012 742 or mandy.campbell@sydney.edu.au

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