Sydney Conservatorium of Music http://music.sydney.edu.au Celebrating 100 years of music in 2015 Fri, 24 Apr 2015 03:17:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Professor Karl Kramer Resigns http://music.sydney.edu.au/professor-karl-kramer-resigns/ http://music.sydney.edu.au/professor-karl-kramer-resigns/#comments Sat, 18 Apr 2015 06:36:56 +0000 http://music.sydney.edu.au/?p=4761 Professor Karl Kramer has today tendered his resignation from the University as Dean of the Sydney Conservatorium of Music for personal and family reasons. Professor Kramer was appointed as Dean in April 2012, and during his time at Sydney has … Continue reading

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Professor Karl Kramer

Professor Karl Kramer

Professor Karl Kramer has today tendered his resignation from the University as Dean of the Sydney Conservatorium of Music for personal and family reasons.

Professor Kramer was appointed as Dean in April 2012, and during his time at Sydney has made a significant contribution to the life of the Conservatorium.

His three-year term was marked with over 10 academic staff hires, the planning and artistic direction of the Conservatorium’s Centenary celebration, and many other initiatives that have enhanced the work of the Conservatorium, an institution of which we are justly very proud.

Professor Kramer’s resignation will take effect on 17 July 2015, so that there can be an appropriate handover and transition. We would like to take this opportunity to thank Professor Kramer for his contribution and wish him well in his future endeavours.

Media enquiries: Kirsten Andrews, 02 9114 0748, 0413 777 404, kirsten.andrews@sydney.edu.au

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From stables to international music institution – the Con turns 100 http://music.sydney.edu.au/from-music-stables-to-international-music-institution-the-con-turns-100/ http://music.sydney.edu.au/from-music-stables-to-international-music-institution-the-con-turns-100/#comments Mon, 13 Apr 2015 04:09:20 +0000 http://music.sydney.edu.au/?p=4734 Next month one of the oldest and most prestigious music schools in Australia, the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, or ‘the Con’ as it is affectionately known by Sydneysiders today, will celebrate its centenary. From its humble beginnings in the converted … Continue reading

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Con staff and students, 1916Next month one of the oldest and most prestigious music schools in Australia, the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, or ‘the Con’ as it is affectionately known by Sydneysiders today, will celebrate its centenary.

From its humble beginnings in the converted horse stables of old Government House to the international institution found today in Sydney’s castle on the fringe of the Royal Botanic Gardens, the Con has long been recognised for launching the careers of countless musicians and instilling a lifelong love of music in generations of music students.

The Con officially opened at a grand concert on 6 May 1915 and teaching began on 6 March 1916 with around 320 students. A century on, it is home to the Conservatorium High School, the Open Academy and the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, the music faculty of the University of Sydney, and sees around 2,500 talented music students pass through its doors each year.

Professor Karl Kramer, Dean and Principal of the University of Sydney’s Conservatorium of Music today, says the vision of the Conservatorium’s first director, Henri Verbrugghen, to ‘provide tuition of a standard equal to that of the leading European conservatoriums’ continues to set the bar high for all who teach and study at the Con.

“It never ceases to amaze me the incredible mix of distinguished teachers from Australia and overseas that walk these corridors. Our students are learning from practicing composers and musicians from leading music organisations like the SSO, the ACO and Opera Australia – as well as from many more music professionals who have trained and worked the world over.

“It is the teaching by these great musicians and mentors that has earned the Con its international reputation and cemented its rightful place in this city and Australia as a world-leading music school,” said Professor Kramer.

The Con’s international status has been influenced by several pioneering directors who have not only been significant in shaping the Con, but have played a formative role in Sydney’s music and cultural scene over the last century. These key figures have included the first director and Belgian violinist Henri Verbrugghen (1915-1922), English conductor and composer Eugene Goossens (1947-1956), and Australian pianist and renowned music educator Rex Hobcroft (1972-1982).

Verbrugghen is credited for setting up Australia’s first state-funded orchestra, the New South Wales State Orchestra in 1919. Goossens, who was also conductor of the Sydney Symphony Orchestra, was instrumental in lobbying for a music performance venue and picked the location for the Sydney Opera House on Bennelong Point in 1955. Hobcroft is recognised for having the vision of a ‘music university’ and harnessing a more modern approach to music education, while lifting the Con’s profile internationally. This vision was fully realised eight years later when the Con amalgamated with the University of Sydney in 1990.

On 6 May 2015 the Con will celebrate its centenary with the Sydney premiere of MASS by Leonard Bernstein – one of the greatest composers of the last century who also wrote Westside Story. More than 400 high school and tertiary students, staff and alumni of the Con, as well as students of the Sydney Children’s Choir, will make up the massive cast that will perform Bernstein’s MASS in the concert hall of the Sydney Opera House.

Professor Eduardo Diazmuñoz, Chair of Conducting at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, who was mentored by Bernstein in the 1970s, said:  “MASS is a masterpiece of the 20th century. Bernstein considered MASS as one of his greatest works.  It is described as a ‘theatre piece for singers, players and dancers’ that will bring to the stage hundreds of Con students in voice, orchestra, jazz, choral music as well as production and sound design.

“It is a challenging piece both musically and theatrically, which makes it a fitting piece to mark the Con’s centenary and showcase the breadth of music talent that continues to evolve from the Con.

“As we look forward to the next 100 years, MASS also sends an important message about tolerance, acceptance and peace in today’s world. This is something that music has always been successful in promoting across cultures and in bringing people together.  It promises to be a memorable centenary event for the Sydney Con,” said Professor Diazmuñoz.

For tickets to the Sydney premiere of Leonard Bernstein’s MASS on 6 May and other Con centenary events across the year visit http://con100years.music.sydney.edu.au/

Media enquiries: Mandy Campbell, 0481 012 742 or mandy.campbell@sydney.edu.au

Above image: Staff and students outside the Con, 1916. Photo: State Library of New South Wales.

Media backgrounders:
MASS by Leonard Bernstein – Fast Facts
Key Con Notes
Planting the Seed
The Centenary of the Con: A history of the Sydney Conservatorium of Music 1915-2015. New publication by Peter McCallum

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Vale Bozidar Kos, Chair of Composition 1985-2002 http://music.sydney.edu.au/vale-bozidar-kos/ http://music.sydney.edu.au/vale-bozidar-kos/#comments Tue, 07 Apr 2015 01:08:22 +0000 http://music.sydney.edu.au/?p=4602 Vale Bozidar Kos (1934-2015) by Anni Heino, Australian Music Centre Composer and widely respected teacher of composition Bozidar Kos has died on 29 March at the age of 80. Kos lived, studied and worked in Australia for 43 years before … Continue reading

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Vale Bozidar Kos (1934-2015)

Bozidar_Kos Composition Chair

Image: Bozidar Kos

Bozidar Kos’s music was influenced by the greats of the post-war European avant-garde from Boulez to Ligeti and Lutoslawski – he has also listed Varèse and Stravinsky as important figures from the point of view of orchestration. In Australia, he is remembered as the composer of an award-winning Violin Concerto (1986), a virtuosic piece with spell-binding microtonal sections. The work was released on a CD (VOX Australis), and later also recorded in Slovenia.

Kos remained active as a composer until very recently – in the past decade he completed three symphonies (Symphony No. 1, 2005/06; Symphony No. 2, 2007/08 and Symphony No. 3, 2012) and several other orchestral works. He combined jazz and classical music in some of his music, particularly the 1993 work Crosswinds, an orchestral piece involving improvising jazz musicians.

Kos’s early musical training consisted of instrumental studies in piano and cello at the State Music School in his hometown of Novo mesto, Slovenia. Initially a student of technology at university, he found time to lead a jazz band and teach cello and music theory, and soon gave up his studies to tour Europe with a jazz ensemble in the late 1950s and early 1960s. The move to Australia in 1965 opened up new opportunities to study music – Kos studied composition at the University of Adelaide under Richard Meale, and electronic music with Peter Tahourdin and Tristram Cary. He also travelled back to Europe to attend summer schools where he had the chance to study with the likes of György Ligeti, Mauricio Kagel and Brian Ferneyhough.

Kos went on to complete three degrees (BMus, MMus and PhD) and to teach composition to generations of students, first in the University of Adelaide (1976-1983) and later at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music until his retirement in 2002.

For many years, Kos was a member of the committee of the ISCM Australia Section, and of the executive committee of the Fellowship of Australian Composers. The program of the 2015 ISCM World Music Days, to be held in Slovenia in September, will feature a work by Kos, Spectrum.

AMC’s CEO John Davis emphasises Kos’s significant legacy as a composer and teacher:

‘Bozidar made a significant contribution to Australian musical life over the more than 40 years that he lived here. He was a composer of considerable intellect and craft, and he leaves a legacy of real substance. His outwardly sometimes serious manner was well-tempered by a warmth and generosity of spirit, and his sense of humour and smiling eyes will be well-remembered by those who knew him.’

Read an interview with Kos, conducted before the composer’s 80th birthday (Resonate 21 May 2014).

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Professor Anne Boyd receives the 2014 Bernard Heinze Award http://music.sydney.edu.au/anne-boyd-receives-the-2014-bernard-heinze-award/ http://music.sydney.edu.au/anne-boyd-receives-the-2014-bernard-heinze-award/#comments Wed, 25 Mar 2015 05:58:20 +0000 http://music.sydney.edu.au/?p=4575 The University of Sydney’s Professor Anne Boyd AM has received the 2014 Sir Bernard Heinze Memorial Award for her outstanding contribution to music in Australia. The award was presented to Professor Boyd at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music 2015 Chancellor’s … Continue reading

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Anne Boyd receives the 2014 Bernard Heinze Award Photo (c) Theo Small

Anne Boyd receives the 2014 Bernard Heinze Award Photo (c) Theo Small

The University of Sydney’s Professor Anne Boyd AM has received the 2014 Sir Bernard Heinze Memorial Award for her outstanding contribution to music in Australia. The award was presented to Professor Boyd at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music 2015 Chancellor’s Concert on Friday 21 March by the University of Melbourne’s Professor Barry Conyngham.

Boyd was the first Australian woman to be appointed Professor of Music at the University of Sydney in 1990. She is one of this country’s most distinguished composers and music educators today.

The Bernard Heinze Award was initiated in 1982, following the death of Sir Bernard Heinze, one of the major pioneers of orchestral musical life in Australia. He was also the Ormond Professor of Music at the University of Melbourne for 31 years.

Professor Barry Conyngham, Dean of the Victorian College of the Arts and Melbourne Conservatorium of Music at the University of Melbourne, said Professor Boyd’s contribution to music in Australia has been significant.

“Her contribution as a composer and commitment to scholarship and music education in Australia is second to none and she is a worthy recipient of this award,” Professor Conyngham said.

During her career, Boyd has received several national and international accolades for her work. In 1996 she was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia for her contribution as a composer and music educator. In 2003 she received an honorary degree from the University of York, England, and in 2005 she was the recipient of the Distinguished Services to Australian Music at the APRA-AMC Classical Music Awards.

Boyd studied music at the University of Sydney in the 1960s, where she was one of the first students of the late Australian composer Peter Sculthorpe. Sculthorpe had a profound influence on her; his music was the first that she had heard, which expressed her experience of the Australian landscape.

Before returning to the University of Sydney in 1990 as a Professor of Music, Boyd spent almost two decades overseas at the University of Hong Kong as its Foundation Head of the Department of Music (1981–90) and teaching at the University of Sussex in England (1972–77).

One of her battles to maintain funding for music courses within the Faculty of Arts at the University of Sydney was the subject of an award-winning documentary Facing the Music (2001), which gained international attention. The Department of Music was then incorporated into the Sydney Conservatorium of Music at University of Sydney in 2005.

With a strong interest in Indigenous Australian spirituality, Boyd is currently exploring a collaborative ‘two ways’ approach in a trilogy of music theatre works on significant Australian women, all of whom worked closely with Aboriginal people Daisy Bates, Olive Pink and Annie Lock. The first of these is a full length opera Daisy Bates at Ooldea, which is a Con centenary commission that was performed by opera students in 2012.

Past recipients of the Bernard Heinze Award include Maestro Richard Bonynge, composer Carl Vine, pianist Stephen McIntyre, singer Yvonne Kenny, composer Peter Sculthorpe, conductor John Hopkins, horn player Barry Tuckwell, violinist Richard Tognetti, conductor and composer Brett Dean, conductor Simone Young and music educator Sir Frank Callaway and musicologist Roger Covell.

Media enquiries: Mandy Campbell, 0481 012 742 or mandy.campbell@sydney.edu.au

About Anne Boyd’s composition work
Boyd writes widely for song cycles, opera, piano, choral, orchestral and chamber music and is published by Faber Music in London and the University of York Music Press. Many of her compositions have an East Asian influence, with a particular interest in the music of Japan and Indonesia.

Her works are often spiritual or meditative by nature, such as the A cappella work As I Crossed a Bridge of Dreams (1975). Her musical compositions include Goldfish Through Summer Rain (1979), The Little Mermaid (1980), Black Sun (1990), Revelations of Divine Love (1995), Meditations on a Chinese Character (1996), A Vision: Jesus Reassures His Mother (1999), and YuYa (2005). Her two solo CDs include Meditations on a Chinese Character (ABC Classics, 1997) and Crossing a Bridge of Dreams (Tall Poppies, 2000).

In the past decade Boy’s commissioned works have included Gate of Water for the ‘Kammer Ensemble’; Angry Earth, a concerto for shakuhachi (Riley Lee) and the Sydney Youth Orchestra, and Ex Deo Lux for the 2007 SSO Fellows. More recent works are Ganba for Baritone Saxophone and piano (2011) and Kabarli Meditation for solo piano (2012) for the Sydney International Piano Competition.

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Hillel String Quartet win Westheimer Fellowship http://music.sydney.edu.au/hillel-string-quartet-win-westheimer-fellowship/ http://music.sydney.edu.au/hillel-string-quartet-win-westheimer-fellowship/#comments Fri, 13 Mar 2015 05:43:17 +0000 http://music.sydney.edu.au/?p=4522 The Sydney Conservatorium of Music is thrilled to announce the Hillel String Quartet as the winners of the 2015 Westheimer String Quartet Fellowship Program. A generous donation was received last year from University alumnus Professor Gerald Westheimer AM, an Australian … Continue reading

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Hillel Quartet

Hillel Quartet – Benjamin Adler (violin), Elizabeth Woolnough (viola), Bethan Lillicrap (violoncello), Bridget O’Donnell (violin) Photo (c) Michael Wilson, The West Australian

The Sydney Conservatorium of Music is thrilled to announce the Hillel String Quartet as the winners of the 2015 Westheimer String Quartet Fellowship Program. A generous donation was received last year from University alumnus Professor Gerald Westheimer AM, an Australian vision scientist and passionate violinist, to create this prestigious Fellowship, where string quartets have the opportunity to receive private coaching, master classes and opportunities to travel overseas and take part in festivals and competitions: music.sydney.edu.au/trio-gifts-cultivate-musicians-world-stage/.

A number of string quartets studying at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music auditioned for the Fellowship and the Hillel String Quartet were selected as the inaugural recipients. The quartet formed in 2012 and participated in the Estivo European Chamber Music Summer School in 2014. The Hillel String Quartet will benefit enormously from this one-year fellowship.

The Westheimer String Quartet Fellowship program will also provide financial assistance to support a program of performance, tuition, travel and development.

“We are thrilled and honoured to be the first recipients of the Westheimer Fellowship, and can’t wait to see where it will take us this year,” said Benjamin Adler, violinist of the Hillel String Quartet. “We are deeply indebted to Dr Westheimer and his visionary generosity.”

The Hillel String Quartet was formed at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music in 2012. Comprising four students of the Sydney Conservatorium, the quartet has received intensive coaching from Dene Olding, Julian Smiles, Georg Eggner, John Harding, Alice Waten, Ole Bohn and Robin Wilson. The Hillel String Quartet has performed at the Sydney Convention Centre, Government House and the University of Sydney, by special request of the Vice Chancellor.

In July 2014, the quartet participated in the inaugural Sydney Conservatorium European Summer Music Festival, during which it gave concerts in Verona and Mantua. In August, the Hillel String Quartet won Second Prize in the Sydney Eisteddfod Musica Viva Chamber Music Award. In September and October, the quartet participated in the Australian Youth Orchestra Chamber Players program in Melbourne, where it was tutored by members of the internationally acclaimed Eggner Trio and performed in Melbourne Conservatorium’s Melba Hall. As the Australian Youth Orchestra String Quartet for 2014, the quartet had the enormous privilege of touring Perth and regional Western Australia over a fortnight in November and December, giving six public concerts and eight school presentations.

Throughout 2014, the Hillel String Quartet performed several public recitals, both at the Sydney Conservatorium and at St James’ Anglican Church, King St as part of its Lunchtime Concert series. It also performed in the City Recital Hall, Angel Place, on the evening of Ray Chen’s first recital in November 2014, upon the invitation of Musica Viva.

 

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Electronic Pioneers returns to the Con http://music.sydney.edu.au/electronic-pioneers-returns-con/ http://music.sydney.edu.au/electronic-pioneers-returns-con/#comments Sat, 21 Feb 2015 09:00:32 +0000 http://music.sydney.edu.au/?p=4378 Martin Wesley-Smith AM, a prominent Australian composer, teacher, activist and pioneer of electronic music will be celebrated in a sell-out concert this Saturday 21 February at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music. Wesley-Smith devoted 26 years of his musical life to … Continue reading

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Martin Wesley-SmithMartin Wesley-Smith AM, a prominent Australian composer, teacher, activist and pioneer of electronic music will be celebrated in a sell-out concert this Saturday 21 February at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music. Wesley-Smith devoted 26 years of his musical life to lecturing in composition and electronic music at the Con from 1974 to 2000.

Adelaide-born Wesley-Smith has had one of the most eclectic careers of any Australian composer. Although computer music, audio-visual works and choral pieces were his first interest, he also composed chamber, orchestral, children’s songs, and music for theatre and film. One of his longest collaborators was his twin brother Peter Wesley-Smith, who wrote the lyrics for much of his choral work.

Professor Karl Kramer, Dean and Principal of the University of Sydney’s Conservatorium of Music, said: “In the Con’s Centenary year, it is fitting to shine the spotlight on great teachers like Martin Wesley-Smith who have given so many years to the Con and helped shape its reputation as a premier international music school, whilst also bringing joy to wider audiences through his music. It is an enormous pleasure to welcome Martin back to the Con to honour and celebrate his illustrious music career.”

In 1974 Wesley-Smith founded the first electronic music studio at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music. It was here that he experimented with the pioneering computer music equipment, the Fairlight CMI.  He was a consultant to the Sydney-based manufacturer, while giving his music students the unique opportunity to experiment on Fairlight’s revolutionary digital sampler. Wesley-Smith’s work For Marimba & Tape (1982), one of the most-performed pieces of Australian so-called ‘serious art-music’, was composed on the Fairlight CMI. In 1986, he also set up the first computer music studio in the People’s Republic of China with fellow composer Ian Fredericks.

Two main themes dominated his music: the life, work and ideas of English author Lewis Carroll, and the plight of the people of East Timor. These interests saw Wesley-Smith respond with varied music from instrumental pieces like db (1991) and Snark-Hunting(1984), to confronting, audio-visual works like Welcome to the Hotel Turismo (2000),Weapons of Mass Distortion (2003) and Papua Merdeka (2005).

Wesley-Smith is also described as a musical activist.  Since 1976, he has created and presented works about the Indonesian occupation of East Timor. His political interests today remain focused on West Papua, Iraq and Australia’s Stolen Generation, which inspired such works as Papua Merdeka (2007), Baghdad Baby Boy (2007), and She Wore a Black Ribbon (2001). Wesley-Smith and his two brothers’ contribution to global awareness of Indonesian atrocities in East Timor saw them receive an Ordem de Timor-Leste from Timor’s President, Taur Matan Ruak, last August.

Martin Wesley-Smith is currently battling cancer, but his treatment has given him some reprieve to put together the retrospective program of his career highlights for the Con concert. Whilst reflecting his musical and political interests, the concert will present pieces not often heard and, in the case of the audio-visual work, not often seen. His music will be performed by many star musicians who worked with the composer during his career. The Sydney Chamber Choir will also feature in the program, to perform two Songs for Snark-Hunters (from the full-length choral music theatre piece Boojum!).

The full concert was recorded and will be broadcast by the ABC Classic FM on Wednesday 25 February at 8pm AEST.

Martin was also interviewed by Stephen Adams for ABC Classic FM and you can listen again to the wonderful interview here – www.abc.net.au/classic/content/2015/02/21/4179547

Media enquiries: Mandy Campbell, 0481 012 742 or mandy.campbell@sydney.edu.au

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Cellist mounts a Galaxy campaign to share her passion for music http://music.sydney.edu.au/cellist-mounts-galaxy-campaign-share-passion-music/ http://music.sydney.edu.au/cellist-mounts-galaxy-campaign-share-passion-music/#comments Fri, 06 Feb 2015 04:19:35 +0000 http://music.sydney.edu.au/?p=4298 Marleen Broekmans, a 26-year-old cellist, cello teacher and part-time student at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, will take to a different stage this month when she competes in the NSW final of the Miss Galaxy pageant. Over the past few … Continue reading

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Marleen Broekmans, a 26-year-old cellist, cello teacher and part-time student at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, will take to a different stage this month when she competes in the NSW final of the Miss Galaxy pageant.

Photo credit: Raimondo Fioravanti

Photo credit: Raimondo Fioravanti

Over the past few months during her fundraising and publicity campaign as a pageant contestant, Marleen has been promoting her passion for music and spreading the word that it is never too late to learn.

Marleen, who is currently undertaking a Master of Music Performance with Danish cellist Georg Pedersen, also teaches the cello and music theory to adult beginners.  In her private studio in Parramatta that she set up in 2005, Marleen has around 50 students, many of whom are adults that she teaches each week.

It was her students who inspired Marleen to undertake postgraduate studies at the Con in 2013. “My research is significant because there is little mention of adult beginner cellists in any current literature, yet I have a studio full of them in Parramatta. They require very different teaching methods compared to children, and lose interest quickly if they don’t see progress.”

Her thesis is investigating the impact music ensembles have on motivating adults to learn and play music, and age-appropriate methods for teaching adult beginner cellists. Central to her teaching and research is getting her adult students to play in ensembles and chamber groups.  It is the ensemble work that Marleen says has shown to improve motivation amongst adults to learn with their peers, and to encourage a life-long love of learning and playing music.

Photo credit: Raimondo Fioravant

Photo credit: Raimondo Fioravant

One of Marleen’s students, 29-year-old Oleen George, began cello lessons at the end of 2009. She said: “Deciding to learn cello without any music history was a big decision. The cello ensemble work lets you play with others of a similar playing level, rather than comparing yourself to your cello tutor.

“At the end of each ensemble you are inspired to keep playing; it recharges you when you doubt yourself, and you get goose bumps when you remember what a room full of cellos feels and sounds like.”

Marleen Broekmans was inspired to enter the Miss Galaxy pageant after her friend, Erin Holland, another recent Con graduate, was crowned Miss World Australia 2013 and seeing the opportunities it gave her. Marleen will compete for the Miss Galaxy NSW at the Zenith Centre in Chatswood on 12 February. The NSW winner will go on to compete for the national title of Miss Galaxy Australia in March.

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Emily Edmonds joins the Royal Opera House http://music.sydney.edu.au/emily-edmonds-scm-2012-joins-royal-opera-house-jette-parker-programme/ http://music.sydney.edu.au/emily-edmonds-scm-2012-joins-royal-opera-house-jette-parker-programme/#comments Wed, 04 Feb 2015 01:50:58 +0000 http://music.sydney.edu.au/?p=4279 Our Sydney Conservatorium of Music graduates are doing great things overseas! Congratulations to mezzo-soprano Emily Edmonds, who has recently performed with Sydney Chamber Opera and Pinchgut Opera, and soon to be joining the Royal Opera House Jette Parker Programme. Emily graduated … Continue reading

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Our Sydney Conservatorium of Music graduates are doing great things overseas!

Emily Edmonds

Congratulations to mezzo-soprano Emily Edmonds, who has recently performed with Sydney Chamber Opera and Pinchgut Opera, and soon to be joining the Royal Opera House Jette Parker Programme. Emily graduated from the Con (first class honours) in 2012 and was a student of Dr Rowena Cowley for six years, until her move to Europe in March 2014.

Emily was one of five singers selected from more than 370 applicants from 59 countries.

The Jette Parker Young Artists work as salaried members of The Royal Opera for a two-year period, during which time they perform in a variety of main-stage productions, concerts and recitals, as well as covering lead roles. They also receive coaching in all opera disciplines, including role interpretation, language and stagecraft.

Find out more about the Royal Opera House Jette Parker Programme.

http://www.roh.org.uk/news/five-new-singers-and-a-stage-director-to-join-the-jette-parker-young-artists-programme-in-september-2015

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Estivo Trio accepted into MICMC http://music.sydney.edu.au/estivo-trio-accepted-micmc/ http://music.sydney.edu.au/estivo-trio-accepted-micmc/#comments Wed, 07 Jan 2015 04:28:20 +0000 http://music.sydney.edu.au/?p=4111 Congratulations to Fox Chan (violin), Ying Ho (piano) and Jonathan Bekes (cello) of the fabulous Estivo Trio, alumni of the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, who have been accepted into the Melbourne International Chamber Music Competition (MICMC). The Estivo Trio were … Continue reading

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estivo trio

Estivo Trio – Fox Chan (violin), Ying Ho (piano) and Jonathan Bekes (cello)

Congratulations to Fox Chan (violin), Ying Ho (piano) and Jonathan Bekes (cello) of the fabulous Estivo Trio, alumni of the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, who have been accepted into the Melbourne International Chamber Music Competition (MICMC).

The Estivo Trio were selected as the only piano trio to attend the inaugural Estivo Summer Chamber Music Festival in Italy, hosted by the Sydney Conservatorium of Music and Il Conservatorio Statale di Musica “Evaristo Felice Dall’Abaco” di Verona and “Conservatorio di Musica “Lucio Campiani”, Mantova. For their first European tour the trio made their debut at the Sala Maffeina, Teatro Filarmonico in Verona, Italy and the Vigeland Museum in Oslo, Norway. Upcoming engagements include concerts and masterclasses in Hong Kong, China, Korea, New Zealand, Australia.

The Melbourne International Chamber Music Competition is a showcase of the best young piano trios and string quartets in the world. It is held every four years and attracts international agents, presenters, venue directors, critics and supporters to Melbourne for a celebration of chamber music and the next generation of performers.

The MICMC only accepts eight piano trios and eight string quartets following big international auditions with over 40 entrants. The competition will in Melbourne in July.

http://www.chambermusicaustralia.com.au/competitions/micmc/

 

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Dr Amanda Harris awarded Honorary Fellowship http://music.sydney.edu.au/dr-amanda-harris-awarded-honorary-fellowship/ http://music.sydney.edu.au/dr-amanda-harris-awarded-honorary-fellowship/#comments Wed, 03 Dec 2014 05:29:08 +0000 http://music.sydney.edu.au/?p=3978 Dr Amanda Harris, Research Associate at Sydney Conservatorium of Music’s PARADISEC has won the National and State Libraries Australasia and Library Council of New South Wales Honorary Fellowship for 2014. Harris has been awarded the Honorary Fellowship at the State … Continue reading

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harris

Dr Amanda Harris

Dr Amanda Harris, Research Associate at Sydney Conservatorium of Music’s PARADISEC has won the National and State Libraries Australasia and Library Council of New South Wales Honorary Fellowship for 2014.

Harris has been awarded the Honorary Fellowship at the State Library of New South Wales for her research project “Imagining an Indigenous Australian Style: the post WWII creative works of Beth Dean and Mirrie Hill”.

This project will examine the personal papers, musical scores and multimedia of choreography Beth Dean and composer Mirrie Hill. This project will focus on the parts of the collections that reveal how they each document Aboriginal music and dance and uses these as the basis for their own creations which, though very different from each other, are linked by their positions as creative women in the period after the Second World War.

More information on the Honorary Fellowship can be found here:
www.sl.nsw.gov.au/about/awards/nsla.html

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